Lloyd's List is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call UK support at +44 (0)20 3377 3996 / APAC support at +65 6508 2430

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction

Human Rights at Sea granted UN special consultative status

A ‘gold standard’ status for Human Rights at Sea strengthens the profile of seafarer rights within the UN system

UN Economic and Social Council status elevates the standing of Human Rights at Sea as an NGO dedicated to helping victims of abuse and advocating for more effective laws and policies to protect people at sea

HUMAN Rights at Sea has been granted special consultative status by the UN’s Economic and Social Council, elevating the group’s influence and the profile of seafarer rights within the UN system.

The formal recognition, which comes nine years after the non-governmental organisation was established by barrister David Hammond to advocate for the human rights of all people at sea globally, effectively upgrades HRAS’ status with key United Nations discussions.

Consultative status is given to civil society organisations on the underlying basis that the UN and the international community can benefit from the expertise of those fighting against human rights violations, struggling against climate change and pushing to achieve the UN's Sustainable Development Goals.

In the NGO world, UN ECOSOC Special Consultative Status is seen as a gold standard badge offering lobbying status and clout within meetings.

On a practical basis it means that HRAS will be able to directly participate in the work of the UN by submitting reports and forming partnerships with governments and the private sector.

The NGO will not, however, automatically be granted consultative status within the International Maritime Organization, which is a UN agency.

To be granted consultative status by the IMO’s Assembly an NGO must demonstrate that it is “truly international” in its membership, “namely that it has a range of members covering a broad geographical scope and, usually, more than one region”.

According to Mr Hammond plan to expand HRAS’ global reach this year should allow the NGO to apply for IMO recognition soon.

“We can quietly celebrate those years of investigations, direct challenges and exposure of abuses at sea with this valuable accreditation,” said Mr Hammond, who stressed that the success of the of the NGO’s achievements to date were the result of to the “tenacity of our staff and volunteers”.

“It has been nearly nine years since Human Rights at Sea opened its doors to raise awareness and prevent, detect and remedy abuses at sea,” said Matthew Vickers, chair of HRAS’s board of trustees. “This is an exciting step in our efforts to join hands with others across the globe to provide long-lasting solutions where it is most needed, and we will seek every opportunity we can to bring our knowledge and expertise to bear on the UN and its subsidiaries' work as part of this prestigious international network.”

Related Content

Topics

  • Related Companies
  • UsernamePublicRestriction

    Register

    LL1143541

    Ask The Analyst

    Please Note: You can also Click below Link for Ask the Analyst
    Ask The Analyst

    Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

    All fields are required.

    Please make sure all fields are completed.

    Please make sure you have filled out all fields

    Please make sure you have filled out all fields

    Please enter a valid e-mail address

    Please enter a valid Phone Number

    Ask your question to our analysts

    Cancel